Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Minkyong: 여러분, 민경이랑 한국어 공부해요.
Keith: And study with me too, I am Keith. Newbie Series, Season 3, Lesson 14. Tell Them To Get Out More Often in Korea.
Minkyong: Hello everyone, I am Minkyong and welcome to KoreanClass101.
Keith: With us, you will learn to speak Korean with fun and effective lessons.
Minkyong: We also provide you with cultural insights
Keith: And tips you won’t find in a textbook. All right, so in this lesson, you will learn how to tell someone to come in and go out. So where does this conversation take place?
Minkyong: This conversation takes place in the house.
Keith: And the husband did something wrong and obviously the wife is very, very upset.
Minkyong: The speakers are married. So therefore they are speaking in the informal Korean 반말.
Keith: Now if you are listening on an iPod
Minkyong: Or an iTouch or iPhone
Keith: Click the center button of the iPod or tap the screen on an iPhone or iTouch to see the lesson notes for this lesson while you listen.
Minkyong: Read along while you listen.
Keith: This technique will help you remember faster. Okay let’s take a listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
무서운 아내: 나가! 빨리 나가!
museoun anae: naga! ppalli naga!
겁많은 남편: 여보... 미안해…
geopmaneun nampyeon: yeobo... mianhae...
무서운 아내: 나가!
museoun anae: naga!
겁많은 남편: 미안해...
geopmaneun nampyeon: mianhae...
무서운 아내: 여보세요?
yeoboseyo
겁많은 남편: 여보... 미안해. 사랑해.
geopmaneun nampyeon: yeobo... mianhae. saranghae.
무서운 아내: 그래... 알았어. 들어와.
museoun anae: geurae... arasseo. deureowa.
겁많은 남편: 나 잠깐... PC방에...
geopmaneun nampyeon: na jamkkan... pissi bang-e...
무서운 아내: 빨리 들어와!!!!
museoun anae: ppalli deureowa!!!
무서운 아내: 나가! 빨리 나가!
museoun anae: naga! ppalli naga!
Scary wife: Get out of here! Get out of here quick!
겁많은 남편: 여보... 미안해…
geopmaneun nampyeon: yeobo... mianhae…
Timid husband: Honey...I'm sorry.
무서운 아내: 나가!
museoun anae: naga!
Scary wife: Get out!!
겁많은 남편: 미안해...
geopmaneun nampyeon: mianhae…
Timid husband: I'm sorry...
무서운 아내: 여보세요?
Yeoboseyo?
Scary wife: Hello?
겁많은 남편: 여보... 미안해. 사랑해.
geopmaneun nampyeon: yeobo... mianhae. Saranghae.
Timid husband: Honey...I'm sorry. I love you.
무서운 아내: 그래... 알았어. 들어와.
museoun anae: geurae... arasseo. Deureowa.
Scary wife: All right. Fine. Come in.
겁많은 남편: 나 잠깐... PC방에...
geopmaneun nampyeon: na jamkkan... pissi bang-e…
Timid husband: I am going to the internet cafe for a second...
무서운 아내: 빨리 들어와!!!!
museoun anae: ppalli deureowa!!!
Scary wife: Come in quick!!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Minkyong: The wife is really scary.
Keith: Yeah but the husband doesn’t really seem to be scared enough.
Minkyong: Why? 왜요?
Keith: Well, his wife was pretty mad and then he is like I am sorry I love you and then she is, okay fine, come in and then he says, but I am going to stop by an internet café, the PC방 just for a little bit. Men should be scared of their wives.
Minkyong: Yeah I agree, I agree.
Keith: But in Korean marriages, who holds the power, the women or the men?
Minkyong: In the house, I think it’s the women.
Keith: I guess it depends on the family but my impression is that Korean women, Korean wives are much more powerful.
Minkyong: Much more powerful?
Keith: Than their male counterparts, their husbands yeah because the husbands are scared.
Minkyong: No, what are you talking about? Korean women are really nice. Korean wives, they are really nice to their husbands, okay maybe not. That’s a lie.
Keith: That’s a total lie.
Minkyong: Okay.
Keith: Korean women are actually very scary to be honest but you know, of course they are nice
Minkyong: But scary.
Keith: But scary, yes, in my opinion.
Minkyong: Yeah.
Keith: Well just really quick before we move on to the vocabulary. Is your father scared of your mother?
Minkyong: Yeah because my father listens to everything that my mom says. Do this, okay. There is no but.
Keith: That’s Korean women for you and Minkyong in the future.
Minkyong: No….
Keith: All right. Well let’s move on to the vocabulary. First phrase we have is
VOCAB LIST
Minkyong: 사랑해.
Keith: I love you.
Minkyong: 사랑해 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 사랑해 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next we have
Minkyong: 빨리
Keith: Fast, quickly.
Minkyong: 빨리 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 빨리 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next
Minkyong: 여보
Keith: Honey, darling.
Minkyong: 여보 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 여보 [natural native speed]
Keith: After that
Minkyong: PC방
Keith: A Korean style internet café.
Minkyong: PC방 [slowly - broken down by syllable] PC방 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next we have
Minkyong: 잠깐
Keith: Just a moment, wait.
Minkyong: 잠깐 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 잠깐 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next
Minkyong: 알았어.
Keith: I got it, I understand.
Minkyong: 알았어 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 알았어 [natural native speed]
Keith: And finally
Minkyong: 미안해.
Keith: I am sorry.
Minkyong: 미안해 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 미안해 [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: All right. Let’s take a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word we are going to take a look at is
Minkyong: 잠깐.
Keith: Just a moment, wait. Can you give us the sample sentence?
Minkyong: 잠깐 괜찮아요?
Keith: And that’s literally a moment, okay but we translate that as, can I have a moment with you. Okay and how did it come out in this dialogue?
Minkyong: The timid husband said 나 잠깐 PC방에.
Keith: And literally that’s I, a moment, internet café. So he is implying he wants to stop by for a minute. So there, he says 나 잠깐 I, a moment, I just for a little bit. Okay can we have one more example?
Minkyong: 잠깐 기다리세요.
Keith: Please wait. That first part is
Minkyong: 잠깐
Keith: Just for a moment and then
Minkyong: 기다리세요.
Keith: Please wait, please wait a second and this word 잠깐 can be used on its own as well. So if I say hey Minkyong, can you help me out over here?
Minkyong: 잠깐.
Keith: Just a moment, wait. So if you just use it on its own, then it means wait, hold on a second and of course that’s in the informal Korean. In formal Korean, 존댓말, what can we say?
Minkyong: 잠깐만요.
Keith: And if you notice, instead of just adding 요 at the end of 잠깐, we have
Minkyong: 잠깐만. 잠깐만요.
Keith: Yeah. We added one more syllable in there. All right, let’s take a look at our next phrase. What do we have?
Minkyong: We have a lot of nice phrases in this lesson especially like this one 사랑해.
Keith: I love you. Okay and of course that’s in the informal Korean. So how do we be a little more polite with that?
Minkyong: 사랑해요.
Keith: And really quickly, in English, we tend to use the word love pretty freely. I love chocolate, I love this pillow, I love my room. Can we say that in Korean?
Minkyong: No. 사랑해요 is only for people. You don’t use it for chocolates and things that you love.
Keith: Well, also I mean I have a friend. I really like him. Oh I love this guy. He is a great guy. I love him. Can we say that?
Minkyong: Probably not. It sounds weird.
Keith: Yeah. So most of the time it’s – I’d say about 99% of the time, it’s used between men and women when they are talking about love like their marriage, let’s get married, let’s have kids, let’s have a family, that kind of love but also you can also use it with your family as well. Ah I love you my son.
Minkyong: 맞아요.
Keith: But between friends, it’s not really so commonly used even if you actually do love your friend, you don’t really say it.
Minkyong: Yeah. We just don’t say it. I don’t know why but-
Keith: So most of the time, it’s between family and/or your significant other.
Minkyong: Uh-huh.
Keith: Okay. So what’s our next phrase?
Minkyong: 미안해.
Keith: I am sorry and this is in casual Korean.
Minkyong: And 미안해요 if you want to sound more polite.
Keith: And that’s the formal version, the polite version but also there is another word if you want to be more polite, even more than 미안해요.
Minkyong: 죄송해요.
Keith: Can you break that down for us?
Minkyong: 죄송해요 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 죄송해요 [natural native speed]
Keith: Right. And it’s a bit more polite than 미안해요 but both are acceptable and both are polite as well.
Minkyong: Yeah.
Keith: All right. Well finally, what’s our last phrase? What do we have?
Minkyong: And the last phrase is 알았어.
Keith: I got it, I understand and this is in the informal Korean. What about formal Korean? How do we be polite?
Minkyong: 알았어요.
Keith: So just add that 요 at the end. What about in this conversation, how did it come out?
Minkyong: The timid husband called his wife and said, I am sorry, I love you and the scary wife said to him, 그래... 알았어. 들어와.
Keith: Okay 알았어 there in that sense, he said I am sorry, I love you. She’s like, fine I got it. Okay, all right. So in that sense, you can use 알았어. So Minkyong, it’s the library. You got to be quiet.
Minkyong: 알았어요.
Keith: Okay, I understand, fine, I got it. Okay well, let’s move on to the focus of this lesson.
Minkyong: 알았어요.

Lesson focus

Keith: All right. Minkyong, so what’s the focus for this lesson?
Minkyong: Get out 나가 and come in 들어와.
Keith: All right. So the verb 나가 is the verb that means to go out or to get out and there, it’s in the presentence and the intimate politeness level, informal Korean. So what’s the dictionary form of this word 나가?
Minkyong: 나가다.
Keith: And 나가 can be used as an imperative sentence but also as a plain sentence if you add other words.
Minkyong: For example, 나 지금 나가.
Keith: I am going out now. Literally what do we have?
Minkyong: 나
Keith: I
Minkyong: 지금
Keith: Now
Minkyong: 나가.
Keith: Go out. I am going out now. Okay so can you give us some example with 나가 as an imperative?
Minkyong: 내 방에서 나가!
Keith: Get out of my room. Okay so how did it come out in this dialogue?
Minkyong: The scary wife said to her timid husband 나가! 빨리 나가!
Keith: Get out of here, get out of here quick, hurry up, get out. All right, well before we get out, what’s our next phrase?
Minkyong: 들어와.
Keith: Come in and you can say this as an imperative phrase as well as a plain sentence and really quickly, what’s the formal form for this phrase?
Minkyong: 들어오세요. or 들어와요.
Keith: Come in and be careful. In English, you could say come in even when you are outside and going into a place but in Korean 들어와 is only for a person who is inside to say to someone who is outside. So for example, if we are outside of McDonald’s but someone is waiting for us, we are on the phone. Hey, we are coming in. In Korean, you can’t say that. You got to be inside and tell someone else who is outside to come in.
Minkyong: Yeah.
Keith: All right. Well Minkyong, can you help us with the sample sentence?
Minkyong: 잠깐 들어와.
Keith: And literally what is that?
Minkyong: 잠깐
Keith: For a moment
Minkyong: 들어와.
Keith: Come in. Why don’t you come in for a second.
Minkyong: Or 잠깐 들어오세요 if you want to be polite.
Keith: Okay. So how did it come out in this dialogue?
Minkyong: The scary wife said to her husband, 빨리 들어와.
Keith: Come in quick, hurry up, come in. Literally that’s come in but she is meaning come home.
Minkyong: Yes.

Outro

Keith: All right. Well that’s going to do it for this lesson. Testing yourself is one of the most effective ways to learn.
Minkyong: That’s why we have three types of quizzes.
Keith: Vocabulary, grammar and content specific.
Minkyong: It’s quiz target a specific skill.
Keith: And together these quizzes will help you master several fundamental skills.
Minkyong: You can find them in the learning center at
Keith: KoreanClass101.com.
Minkyong: Yeay!
Keith: All right. Well that’s going to do it for this lesson. Thanks for studying Korean with us.
Minkyong: 안녕히 계세요.
Keith: Bye bye.

Grammar

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26 Comments

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Have you used any of these expressions recently? :) 나가. 들어와. 미안해. 사랑해.

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Monday at 9:27 pm
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Hi Fredrik,


Thank you for commenting. Both 죄송합니다 and 죄송해요 are a polite way of apologizing, but the former is the more polite way of saying sorry, and you would use that in a more 'official' situation (apologizng at work or to someone your senior). The latter is also polite but not AS polite as 죄송합니다.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Fredrik Konradsson
Friday at 5:42 pm
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What's the different between 죄송합니다 and 죄송해요?

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Monday at 7:04 pm
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Hi Ian,


Thanks for posting. If you're asking how to say 'May I come in', it would be:


들어가도 되요/될까요? (Can I go inside?)


Please let us know if you have any other inquiries.

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Ian
Saturday at 7:42 am
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Please can you advise on what you say instead of may I come in?

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Friday at 5:47 pm
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Hi Juri,


Thank you for posting. The formal way of telling someone to 'get out' would be:


나가 주세요. (most polite)

나가세요. (polite)


Sincerely,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Juri
Friday at 7:07 am
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안녕하세요 ^^

Thank you again, I have a question..how can I say 나가 in formal way ?

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Sunday at 2:32 pm
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Hi Crysh,


That's right. :thumbsup:


감사합니다.

클레어

Team KoreanClass101.com

Crysh
Friday at 4:33 am
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So we have..

나오다 - come out

나가다 - to go out/leave

들어오다 - to enter, to come in

들어가다 - to go into/to enter


Very interesting... :)


크리시

KoreanClass101
Monday at 11:19 pm
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Hey Patrick,



You know it is always up to a person not just Korean girls!:P


Also thank you for the suggestion on flash cards.


That could actually be the good reference and a reminder for flashcards!


We will keep it informed. Thank you so much!:D






Thank you


Madison

Team KoreanClass101.com

Patrick 팻
Saturday at 3:08 pm
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ㅋㅋㅋㅋ 웃겨!

Funny lesson..

Min jung! You sound so scary when you laugh and say "korean wives are nice to their husbands- actually that's a lie".. I am now reluctant to marry a korean girl haha joking!

I'm learning so much from these classes! Especially adding the vocab words to flashcard decks..

Was a little surprised 나가 and 들어와 weren't added to the list..

Thankyou!!