Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Tim: Hello everyone! I'm Tim, and welcome to KoreanPOD101.
Debbie: With us, you'll learn to speak Korean with fun and effective lessons.
Tim: We also provide you with cultural insights...
Debbie: ...and tips you won't find in a textbook.
Debbie: Welcome back to KoreanClass101.com! The fastest...
Tim: Easiest...
Debbie: And most fun way to learn Korean! I am joined in the studio by...
Tim: Tim! 방가 방가 everyone! We've missed you guys so much! Didn't you, Debbie?
Debbie: Yes! I was dying to meet all the KoreanClass101.com listeners again!
Tim: Okay! Let's talk about today's lesson. What are we learning today, Debbie?
Debbie: In this lesson, we are going to learn about the 'Possessive Marking Adjective'.
Tim: Yes. Just like how English has...
Debbie: Noun + '(apostrophe)s
Tim: Korean also has a very similar one - noun + "-의".
Debbie: We will also learn some useful words and expression such as "there is / there are" and "Ah! Is that so? / That is so!" and lastly, "I got it!" in Korean. Tim, where does this conversation take place?
Tim: At the restaurant...식당에서...
Debbie: The conversation is between...
Tim: Tim and a waitress. 팀과 웨이트리스.
Debbie: Since this conversation is between two adults who don't know each other well, the speakers will use formal Korean.
Tim: 존댓말 입니다.
Debbie: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
팀: 저기요, 제 신발을 찾고 있습니다.
웨이트리스: 아... 신발들은 여기에 있습니다.
웨이트리스: 남성분들의 신발은 여기에,
웨이트리스: 여성분들의 신발은 저기에 있습니다.
팀: 아, 그래요... 알겠습니다.
팀: 어! 이것은 내것 아닌데...!?
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
팀: 저기요, 제 신발을 찾고 있습니다.
웨이트리스: 아... 신발들은 여기에 있습니다.
웨이트리스: 남성분들의 신발은 여기에,
웨이트리스: 여성분들의 신발은 저기에 있습니다.
팀: 아, 그래요... 알겠습니다.
팀: 어! 이것은 내것 아닌데...!?
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
팀: 저기요, 제 신발을 찾고 있습니다.
Debbie: Excuse me. I am looking for my shoes.
웨이트리스: 아... 신발들은 여기에 있습니다.
Debbie: Ah...the shoes are over here.
웨이트리스: 남성분들의 신발은 여기에,
Debbie: All the men's shoes are here.
웨이트리스: 여성분들의 신발은 저기에 있습니다.
Debbie: All the women's shoes are there.
팀: 아, 그래요... 알겠습니다.
Debbie: Oh, I see...I understand.
팀: 어! 이것은 내것 아닌데...!?
Debbie: Uh-oh! These shoes aren't mine...
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Debbie: Did Tim lose his shoes at the restaurant?
Tim: I don't know... I hope not! I think he'll find his shoes. I know a lot about Tim in this series. Plus, his shoes are not expensive! So no one would steal his shoes!
Debbie: 하하! So you are saying that is Tim is cheap?
Tim: No. I didn't say that! All I meant was that he doesn't need to worry about his shoes because his shoes are...
Debbie: Cheap!
Tim: Fine. Whatever you say!
Debbie: So Tim, I'm from the US and you have lived in Canada for a couple of years. In western culture, we normally don't take our shoes off at a restaurant, right?
Tim: Yes. You are right, but in Korea it's different! At some restaurants, you need to take your shoes off.
Debbie: How about socks? Do we need to take them off as well?
Tim: No, Debbie! Please keep your socks on at Korean restaurants.
Debbie: Guys, did you hear that? We don't need to worry about our socks!
Tim: 하하~~
Debbie: Okay...Now we know, at some Korean restaurants, we need to take our shoes off. What else do we need to know?
Tim: Hmm... Normally, men's shoes and women's shoes are separated.
Debbie: Thanks for the tips, Tim!
Tim: You're welcome!
Debbie: Now Let's move on to the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Debbie: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Tim: 제 [natural native speed]
Debbie: my (humble-form)
Tim: 제 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 제 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 신발 [natural native speed]
Debbie: shoes
Tim: 신발 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 신발 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 있습니다 [natural native speed]
Debbie: there is/there are (polite form)
Tim: 있습니다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 있습니다 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 남성 [natural native speed]
Debbie: male
Tim: 남성 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 남성 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 여성 [natural native speed]
Debbie: women
Tim: 여성 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 여성 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 그래요 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Is that so? / That is so.
Tim: 그래요 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 그래요 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 알겠습니다 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Okay., All right., I understand.
Tim: 알겠습니다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 알겠습니다 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 내 것 [natural native speed]
Debbie: mine
Tim: 내 것 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 내 것 [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...?
Tim: 있습니다 - 있.습.니.다 - 있습니다.
Debbie: Meaning "there is / there are". How can you say "there are shoes" in Korean?
Tim: "Shoes" are 신.발 - 신발 in Korean. Therefore, "there are shoes" is 신.발.이. 있.습.니.다 - 신발이 있습니다 in Korean.
Debbie: How about "there is coffee" in Korean?
Tim: As you already know, "coffee" is 커피. Therefore, "there is coffee" is 커.피.가. 있.습.니.다 - 커피가 있습니다 in Korean.
Debbie: Okay listeners please repeat after Tim. "There are shoes" is...
Tim: 신발이 있습니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Great! Next we have... "Ah! Is that so? / That is so!" How do you say that in Korean?
Tim: 아! 그래요!?
Debbie: Can you repeat it one more time?
Tim: 아. 그.래.요! - 아 그래요!
Debbie: It's a Korean expression that is used when realizing a new fact or situation.
Tim: 아! 그래요?
Debbie: Tim, (협박하는 목소리로) I know what you did last summer?
Tim: 아! 그래요? "Is that so?"
Debbie: 하하, and Last, we have...
Tim: 알겠습니다 - 알.겠.습.니.다 - 알겠습니다.
Debbie: Meaning "I got it! / I understood!"
Tim: 알겠습니다 "I got it!" is usually followed by "yes" 네 / 예 in Korean. So, it sounds like this - 예, 알겠습니다. or 네~~ 알겠습니다.
Debbie: Listeners, 알겠습니다 is formal Korean. What's the informal form of 알겠습니다?
Tim: 알.겠.어 - 알겠어.
Debbie: Tim, let's pretend you are my student and if I ask you, (부드럽게) "Do you understand, Tim?" then...?
Tim: 예, 알겠습니다 teacher!
Debbie: Now let's pretend you're my best friend and if I ask you, (매우 친근하게) "Hey, you got that?" then....?
Tim: 응, 알겠어!
Debbie: Great! Now let's move on to the grammar.
LESSON FOCUS
Debbie: The focus of this lesson is on the 'Possessive Marking Adjective'. Just like how English has - '(apostrophe)s, Korean has...
Tim: "의"
Debbie: Which is replaced by an '(apostrophe)s.
Tim: Can you think of a good example, Debbie?
Debbie: Hmm... How about "Tim's"?
Tim: Okay. "Tim" is 팀 in Korean and "Tim's" is 팀 + 의 - 팀의 in Korean.
Debbie: We've just learned about "there is/there are" - 있습니다. What's "There are shoes" in Korean?
Tim: 신발이 있습니다.
Debbie: How about... "There are Tim's shoes" in Korean?
Tim: "Tim's" is 팀의 in Korean so, altogether 팀"의" 신발이 있습니다 "There are Tim's shoes".
Debbie: How about... "my" in Korean?
Tim: "I" is 저 in formal Korean and "my" is...
Debbie: 저 + 의 so it becomes...
Tim: 저의 "my" in formal Korean. How about informal "I" in Korean?
Debbie: 나. so 나 "I" + 의 becomes,
Tim: 나.의 - 나의 "my" in informal Korean.
Debbie: What's "my shoes" in Korean?
Tim: 저의 신발 / 나의 신발.
Debbie: Listeners, please repeat after Tim. What's "there are my shoes" in formal Korean?
Tim: 저의 신발이 있습니다.
[pause]
Debbie: What's "there are my shoes" in informal Korean?
Tim: 나의 신발이 있습니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Tim, do you know how to make a Possessive Pronoun?
Tim: It's very easy! Simply add 것 right after Possessive Marking Particle 의.
Debbie: For example, "mine" is...
Tim: "My" is 나의 in Korean and + 것 so it becomes 나.의.것 - 나의 것 "mine"
Debbie: "You" is 당신 in Korean and,
Tim: "Your" is 당신 + 의 so it becomes 당신의 in Korean and,
Debbie: "Yours" is 당신의 "your" + 것 so it becomes...
Tim: 당.신.의.것 - 당신의 것 "yours".
Debbie: Great! The Possessive Marking Particle and Possessive Pronoun is easy to learn in Korean! That's all for this lesson. Don't forget that you can leave us a comment or some feedback on this lesson.
Tim: It's very easy to do. Just stop by KoreanClass101.com, and click on comments...
Debbie: Enter your name and a comment...
Tim: And that's it!
Debbie: Okay, everyone. See you next time.
Tim: 여러분 즐겁게 한국어 공부하세요...

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49 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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You will learn about Possessive noun - 의 ui. please feel free to leave any comment or question. What's "this is Tim's shoes" in Korean?

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KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 6:54 am
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Hi Greg,


Thanks for posting 제 is the shortened version of 저의. Both are correct.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

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Greg B
Sunday at 8:31 am
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Which "che" or "my is correct? 제 or 저의?

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KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 12:44 am
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Hi Michael,


Thanks for posting. Think of it this way--네 is close to the 'ne' sound in 'never', while 내 is close to (but you would not open your mouth as wide) the 'a' sound in 'apple'.

I hope this helped somewhat.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

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Michael Fine
Monday at 6:29 am
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It's very difficult for me to hear or remember the difference between 내 (my) and 네(your). Any tips?

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KoreanClass101.com
Saturday at 7:35 pm
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Hi Michael,


Thank you for your positive feedback!


Let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team KoreanClass101.com

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Michael
Friday at 7:44 am
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Tim and Debbie - you are excellent teachers! I'm so glad I found your series and spending years on Koreanclass101.com. No disrespect to the other teachers but I like the way you teach and reinforce what we are learning.

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KoreanClass101.com
Wednesday at 4:33 pm
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Hello Joelle,


Thank you for your comment!

Here is the answer to your question.

[내] is the shortened form of [나의](my), and [네] is the shortened form of [너의](your).

Hope it helped!


Best,

Rebecca

Team KoreanClass101.com

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Joelle
Saturday at 5:31 am
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I would be helpful for me to hear the difference between 내 and 네

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KoreanClass101.com
Wednesday at 2:51 pm
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Hi Lilia,


Thank you for your comment!

[제] is the shortened form of [저의], and [내] is the shortened form of [나의].

And here are some examples of how possessive pronouns are used.

1. 그 가방은 저의 것입니다. "That bad is mine."

2. 이 지갑은 제 어머니 것입니다. (Both positive marking adjective and possessive pronouns are used in this sentence.) This wallet is my mother's.

Hope it helped, and please let me know if you have more questions!


Best,

Rebecca

Team KoreanClass101.com

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Lilia
Thursday at 8:10 am
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Sorry but I'm still having some trouble understanding the difference between 제 / 내 and 저의 / 나의 if there even is one. Up until now I've heard 제 and 내 being used to mean "my".

Also, when would you use the possessive pronouns instead of just the possessive?

Thank you for the wonderful lessons.