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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Tim: Hello everyone! I'm Tim, and welcome to KoreanPOD101.
Debbie: With us, you'll learn to speak Korean with fun and effective lessons.
Tim: We also provide you with cultural insights...
Debbie: ...and tips you won't find in a textbook.
Debbie: Welcome back to KoreanClass101.com! The fastest...
Tim: Easiest...
Debbie: And most fun way to learn Korean! I am joined in the studio by...
Tim: Tim! 방가 방가 everyone! We've missed you guys so much! Didn't you, Debbie?
Debbie: Yes! I was dying to meet all the KoreanClass101.com listeners again!
Tim: Okay! Let's talk about today's lesson. What are we learning today, Debbie?
Debbie: In this lesson, we are going to learn about the 'Possessive Marking Adjective'.
Tim: Yes. Just like how English has...
Debbie: Noun + '(apostrophe)s
Tim: Korean also has a very similar one - noun + "-의".
Debbie: We will also learn some useful words and expression such as "there is / there are" and "Ah! Is that so? / That is so!" and lastly, "I got it!" in Korean. Tim, where does this conversation take place?
Tim: At the restaurant...식당에서...
Debbie: The conversation is between...
Tim: Tim and a waitress. 팀과 웨이트리스.
Debbie: Since this conversation is between two adults who don't know each other well, the speakers will use formal Korean.
Tim: 존댓말 입니다.
Debbie: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
팀: 저기요, 제 신발을 찾고 있습니다.
웨이트리스: 아... 신발들은 여기에 있습니다.
웨이트리스: 남성분들의 신발은 여기에,
웨이트리스: 여성분들의 신발은 저기에 있습니다.
팀: 아, 그래요... 알겠습니다.
팀: 어! 이것은 내것 아닌데...!?
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
팀: 저기요, 제 신발을 찾고 있습니다.
웨이트리스: 아... 신발들은 여기에 있습니다.
웨이트리스: 남성분들의 신발은 여기에,
웨이트리스: 여성분들의 신발은 저기에 있습니다.
팀: 아, 그래요... 알겠습니다.
팀: 어! 이것은 내것 아닌데...!?
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
팀: 저기요, 제 신발을 찾고 있습니다.
Debbie: Excuse me. I am looking for my shoes.
웨이트리스: 아... 신발들은 여기에 있습니다.
Debbie: Ah...the shoes are over here.
웨이트리스: 남성분들의 신발은 여기에,
Debbie: All the men's shoes are here.
웨이트리스: 여성분들의 신발은 저기에 있습니다.
Debbie: All the women's shoes are there.
팀: 아, 그래요... 알겠습니다.
Debbie: Oh, I see...I understand.
팀: 어! 이것은 내것 아닌데...!?
Debbie: Uh-oh! These shoes aren't mine...
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Debbie: Did Tim lose his shoes at the restaurant?
Tim: I don't know... I hope not! I think he'll find his shoes. I know a lot about Tim in this series. Plus, his shoes are not expensive! So no one would steal his shoes!
Debbie: 하하! So you are saying that is Tim is cheap?
Tim: No. I didn't say that! All I meant was that he doesn't need to worry about his shoes because his shoes are...
Debbie: Cheap!
Tim: Fine. Whatever you say!
Debbie: So Tim, I'm from the US and you have lived in Canada for a couple of years. In western culture, we normally don't take our shoes off at a restaurant, right?
Tim: Yes. You are right, but in Korea it's different! At some restaurants, you need to take your shoes off.
Debbie: How about socks? Do we need to take them off as well?
Tim: No, Debbie! Please keep your socks on at Korean restaurants.
Debbie: Guys, did you hear that? We don't need to worry about our socks!
Tim: 하하~~
Debbie: Okay...Now we know, at some Korean restaurants, we need to take our shoes off. What else do we need to know?
Tim: Hmm... Normally, men's shoes and women's shoes are separated.
Debbie: Thanks for the tips, Tim!
Tim: You're welcome!
Debbie: Now Let's move on to the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Debbie: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Tim: 제 [natural native speed]
Debbie: my (humble-form)
Tim: 제 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 제 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 신발 [natural native speed]
Debbie: shoes
Tim: 신발 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 신발 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 있습니다 [natural native speed]
Debbie: there is/there are (polite form)
Tim: 있습니다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 있습니다 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 남성 [natural native speed]
Debbie: male
Tim: 남성 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 남성 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 여성 [natural native speed]
Debbie: women
Tim: 여성 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 여성 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 그래요 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Is that so? / That is so.
Tim: 그래요 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 그래요 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 알겠습니다 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Okay., All right., I understand.
Tim: 알겠습니다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 알겠습니다 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 내 것 [natural native speed]
Debbie: mine
Tim: 내 것 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 내 것 [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...?
Tim: 있습니다 - 있.습.니.다 - 있습니다.
Debbie: Meaning "there is / there are". How can you say "there are shoes" in Korean?
Tim: "Shoes" are 신.발 - 신발 in Korean. Therefore, "there are shoes" is 신.발.이. 있.습.니.다 - 신발이 있습니다 in Korean.
Debbie: How about "there is coffee" in Korean?
Tim: As you already know, "coffee" is 커피. Therefore, "there is coffee" is 커.피.가. 있.습.니.다 - 커피가 있습니다 in Korean.
Debbie: Okay listeners please repeat after Tim. "There are shoes" is...
Tim: 신발이 있습니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Great! Next we have... "Ah! Is that so? / That is so!" How do you say that in Korean?
Tim: 아! 그래요!?
Debbie: Can you repeat it one more time?
Tim: 아. 그.래.요! - 아 그래요!
Debbie: It's a Korean expression that is used when realizing a new fact or situation.
Tim: 아! 그래요?
Debbie: Tim, (협박하는 목소리로) I know what you did last summer?
Tim: 아! 그래요? "Is that so?"
Debbie: 하하, and Last, we have...
Tim: 알겠습니다 - 알.겠.습.니.다 - 알겠습니다.
Debbie: Meaning "I got it! / I understood!"
Tim: 알겠습니다 "I got it!" is usually followed by "yes" 네 / 예 in Korean. So, it sounds like this - 예, 알겠습니다. or 네~~ 알겠습니다.
Debbie: Listeners, 알겠습니다 is formal Korean. What's the informal form of 알겠습니다?
Tim: 알.겠.어 - 알겠어.
Debbie: Tim, let's pretend you are my student and if I ask you, (부드럽게) "Do you understand, Tim?" then...?
Tim: 예, 알겠습니다 teacher!
Debbie: Now let's pretend you're my best friend and if I ask you, (매우 친근하게) "Hey, you got that?" then....?
Tim: 응, 알겠어!
Debbie: Great! Now let's move on to the grammar.

Lesson focus

Debbie: The focus of this lesson is on the 'Possessive Marking Adjective'. Just like how English has - '(apostrophe)s, Korean has...
Tim: "의"
Debbie: Which is replaced by an '(apostrophe)s.
Tim: Can you think of a good example, Debbie?
Debbie: Hmm... How about "Tim's"?
Tim: Okay. "Tim" is 팀 in Korean and "Tim's" is 팀 + 의 - 팀의 in Korean.
Debbie: We've just learned about "there is/there are" - 있습니다. What's "There are shoes" in Korean?
Tim: 신발이 있습니다.
Debbie: How about... "There are Tim's shoes" in Korean?
Tim: "Tim's" is 팀의 in Korean so, altogether 팀"의" 신발이 있습니다 "There are Tim's shoes".
Debbie: How about... "my" in Korean?
Tim: "I" is 저 in formal Korean and "my" is...
Debbie: 저 + 의 so it becomes...
Tim: 저의 "my" in formal Korean. How about informal "I" in Korean?
Debbie: 나. so 나 "I" + 의 becomes,
Tim: 나.의 - 나의 "my" in informal Korean.
Debbie: What's "my shoes" in Korean?
Tim: 저의 신발 / 나의 신발.
Debbie: Listeners, please repeat after Tim. What's "there are my shoes" in formal Korean?
Tim: 저의 신발이 있습니다.
[pause]
Debbie: What's "there are my shoes" in informal Korean?
Tim: 나의 신발이 있습니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Tim, do you know how to make a Possessive Pronoun?
Tim: It's very easy! Simply add 것 right after Possessive Marking Particle 의.
Debbie: For example, "mine" is...
Tim: "My" is 나의 in Korean and + 것 so it becomes 나.의.것 - 나의 것 "mine"
Debbie: "You" is 당신 in Korean and,
Tim: "Your" is 당신 + 의 so it becomes 당신의 in Korean and,
Debbie: "Yours" is 당신의 "your" + 것 so it becomes...
Tim: 당.신.의.것 - 당신의 것 "yours".
Debbie: Great! The Possessive Marking Particle and Possessive Pronoun is easy to learn in Korean! That's all for this lesson. Don't forget that you can leave us a comment or some feedback on this lesson.
Tim: It's very easy to do. Just stop by KoreanClass101.com, and click on comments...
Debbie: Enter your name and a comment...
Tim: And that's it!
Debbie: Okay, everyone. See you next time.
Tim: 여러분 즐겁게 한국어 공부하세요...

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51 Comments

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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You will learn about Possessive noun - 의 ui. please feel free to leave any comment or question. What's "this is Tim's shoes" in Korean?

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Wednesday at 4:51 am
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Hi Jeffrey,


Thanks for posting. In Korean, the plural form is usually included in the word itself, so it would be:


이것들은 팀의 신발입니다.

-->이것은 팀의 신발입니다.


Keep up the good work!

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Jeffrey Condon
Friday at 1:10 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I'll give it a shot, but shouldn't the question be how to say "these are Tim's shoes" since shoes are plural?. 이것들은 팀의 신발입니다

KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 6:54 am
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Hi Greg,


Thanks for posting 제 is the shortened version of 저의. Both are correct.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Greg B
Sunday at 8:31 am
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Which "che" or "my is correct? 제 or 저의?

KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 12:44 am
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Hi Michael,


Thanks for posting. Think of it this way--네 is close to the 'ne' sound in 'never', while 내 is close to (but you would not open your mouth as wide) the 'a' sound in 'apple'.

I hope this helped somewhat.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Michael Fine
Monday at 6:29 am
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It's very difficult for me to hear or remember the difference between 내 (my) and 네(your). Any tips?

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Saturday at 7:35 pm
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Hi Michael,


Thank you for your positive feedback!


Let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team KoreanClass101.com

Michael
Friday at 7:44 am
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Tim and Debbie - you are excellent teachers! I'm so glad I found your series and spending years on Koreanclass101.com. No disrespect to the other teachers but I like the way you teach and reinforce what we are learning.

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Wednesday at 4:33 pm
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Hello Joelle,


Thank you for your comment!

Here is the answer to your question.

[내] is the shortened form of [나의](my), and [네] is the shortened form of [너의](your).

Hope it helped!


Best,

Rebecca

Team KoreanClass101.com

Joelle
Saturday at 5:31 am
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I would be helpful for me to hear the difference between 내 and 네