Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Debbie: Hello, and welcome back to the KoreanPOD101.com , the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Korean! I'm joined in the studio by...
Tim: Hello everyone. Tim here.
Tim: Hello everyone and welcome back to KoreanClass101.com. The fastest, easiest, and...
Debbie: The most fun way to learn Korean! I am joined in the studio by...
Tim: Tim! 여러분 잘 지내셨어요?
Debbie: Hmm... Tim, we haven't learned about that expression yet. Why don't we explain what you just said? I think that can be a very useful expression for many listeners.
Tim: Sure! First, 여러분 means "everybody".
Debbie: You can also substitute "everybody" with another name, such as... 팀. "팀, 잘 지내셨어요?"
Tim: And... 잘 means "good or well".
Debbie: (clearly) 지내셨어요? means, "How have you been?" so altogether "Hello everyone, how have you been?" is...?
Tim: 안녕하세요 여러분 "Hello everyone", 잘 지내셨어요? "How have you been?"
Debbie: Since that's a very formal expression of "How have you been?"...what would be an informal way to say, "How have you been?"?
Tim: 잘 지냈어?
Debbie: How would you greet someone who is younger than you?
Tim: 잘 지냈어? "Hey! How have you been?"
Debbie: Then how would you greet who is older than you?
Tim: 잘 지내셨어요? "Hello. How have you been, sir or ma'am?"
Debbie: Great! Now let's start talking about today's lesson. What are we learning today?
Tim: Today we are going to learn about the preposition, 에, which means "at or in" in English.
Debbie: We will also learn about three important words such as "morning, afternoon, and evening". Okay. Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
(an alarm clock rings...)
(아침에, 점심에, 저녁에)
저는 아침 7시에 일어납니다.
아침에 커피를 마십니다.
아침은 8시에 먹습니다.
오후에는 숙제를 합니다.
점심은 1시에 먹습니다.
저녁에는 운동을 합니다.
저녁은 6시에 먹습니다.
그리고 밤 10시에 잡니다.
(an alarm clock rings...)
(아침에, 점심에, 저녁에)
저는 아침 7시에 일어납니다.
아침에 커피를 마십니다.
아침은 8시에 먹습니다.
오후에는 숙제를 합니다.
점심은 1시에 먹습니다.
저녁에는 운동을 합니다.
저녁은 6시에 먹습니다.
그리고 밤 10시에 잡니다.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
(an alarm clock rings...)
Debbie(an alarm clock rings)
(아침에, 점심에, 저녁에)
Debbie(in the morning, in the afternoon, and in the evening)
저는 아침 7시에 일어납니다.
DebbieI get up at seven o'clock in the morning.
아침에 커피를 마십니다.
DebbieI drink coffee in the morning.
아침은 8시에 먹습니다.
Debbie(I) eat breakfast at eight o'clock.
오후에는 숙제를 합니다.
Debbie(I) do homework in the afternoon.
점심은 1시에 먹습니다.
Debbie(I) eat lunch at one o'clock.
저녁에는 운동을 합니다.
Debbie(I) do exercise in the evening.
저녁은 6시에 먹습니다.
Debbie(I) eat dinner at six o'clock.
그리고 밤 10시에 잡니다.
Debbieand I go to sleep at ten o'clock at night.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Debbie: Tim, what time do you usually get up in the morning?
Tim: 저는 "I", 다섯시(강조하며)"에" "at 5", 일어납니다 "get up". "I get up at 5!"
Debbie: No way! I don't believe you. You get up (강조하며)"at" 5 a.m.? I don't believe you! Be honest.
Tim: (정색을 하며 in a serious voice) I swear! It's the truth! I wake up at 5, but then I fall back asleep again!
Debbie: I knew it. But why do you wake up at 5?
Tim: (부끄러워하며 embarrassed) To use the bathroom...
Debbie: I see. It's okay. I wake up early to use the bathroom, too. By the way, Tim...Do you know about rush hour'?
Tim: (신나하며 feeling energetic) Of course! I've seen the whole 'Rush Hour' trilogy! I'm a big fan of Jackie Chan! (쿵푸 목소리로 sounds of Kung-fu) 후후! 허! 하~~!! 아~~요~~!
Debbie: (한심한 목소리로 hopeless voice) Oh, Tim! No! I am (강조하며) "NOT" talking about the movie, "Rush Hour". I am talking about (강조하며 emphasizing) the rush hour in Korea in the morning!
Tim: Oh...THAT rush hour! It's between 일곱시 부터 "from 7" 여덟시 까지 "to 8" in the morning.
Debbie: Okay, listeners. If you visit Korea, please be aware of "rush hour" traffic! Roads, sidewalks and subway stations are crowded and jam-packed with cars and people during rush hour, so try to avoid commuting during these times.
Tim: 예, 맞아요! Yes, that's right!
Debbie: Now let's move on to the lesson vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Debbie: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Tim: 아침 [natural native speed]
Debbie: morning
Tim: 아침 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 아침 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 일어나다 [natural native speed]
Debbie: to get up, to wake up
Tim: 일어나다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 일어나다 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 아침 (식사) [natural native speed]
Debbie: breakfast
Tim: 아침 (식사) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 아침 (식사) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 오후 [natural native speed]
Debbie: afternoon
Tim: 오후 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 오후 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 숙제 [natural native speed]
Debbie: homework
Tim: 숙제 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 숙제 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 점심 [natural native speed]
Debbie: lunch (meal)
Tim: 점심 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 점심 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 저녁 [natural native speed]
Debbie: evening, dinner
Tim: 저녁 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 저녁 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 운동 [natural native speed]
Debbie: exercise
Tim: 운동 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 운동 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 그리고 [natural native speed]
Debbie: and, also
Tim: 그리고 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 그리고 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 자다 [natural native speed]
Debbie: to sleep
Tim: 자다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 자다 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 먹다 [natural native speed]
Debbie: to eat
Tim: 먹다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 먹다 [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at the some words from this lesson. The first word is...?
Tim: 아.침 - 아침.
Debbie: which could mean either "morning" or "breakfast" depending on the context.
Tim: Debbie, can you give us some examples?
Debbie: Hmm.... How about... "in the morning"?
Tim: "In the morning" is 아.침.에 - 아침에.
Debbie: How about... "I eat breakfast"?
Tim: The subject, "I" is 저는 and, the object, "breakfast" is 아.침.을 and the verb, "to eat" is 먹습니다. Therefore, "I eat breakfast" is 저는 아침을 먹습니다.
Debbie: Hmm... How about "I eat breakfast in the morning."?
Tim: Good! "I" is 저는...
Debbie: "in the morning" is 아침에...
Tim: "breakfast" is 아침을
Debbie: And "eat" is 먹습니다. Then, "I eat breakfast in the morning." is...
Tim: 저는 아침에 아침을 먹습니다. Please repeat after me. 저는 아침에 아침을 먹습니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Great! Next we have...
Tim: 점.심 - 점심.
Debbie: Again, this could mean either "afternoon" or "lunch".
Tim: Can you give some examples of that, Debbie?
Debbie: What's "in the afternoon" in Korean?
Tim: 점심"에".
Debbie: How about... "He eats lunch."
Tim: The subject, "he" is 그는 and, the object, "lunch" is 점심을 and the verb, "to eat" is 먹습니다. All together, "He eats lunch" is 그는 점심을 먹습니다.
Debbie: How about "He eats lunch in the afternoon"?
Tim: "He" is 그는.
Debbie: "In the afernoon" is 오후에.
Tom: "Lunch" is 점심을.
Debbie: "To eat" is 먹습니다. Then, "He eats lunch in the afternoon" is...?
Tim: 그는 점심에 점심을 먹습니다. Please repeat after me. 그는 점심에 점심을 먹습니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Excellent! Finally the last word is...?
Tim: 저.녁 - 저녁.
Debbie: This could mean either "evening" or "dinner".
Tim: Can you give us some examples of that?
Debbie: What's "in the evening" in Korean?
Tim: 저녁"에"
Debbie: How about... "Mom eats dinner"?
Tim: The subject, "mom" is 엄마는 and the object, "dinner" is 저녁을 and the verb, "to eat" is 먹습니다. "Mom eats dinner" is 엄마는 저녁을 먹습니다.
Debbie: How about "Mom eats dinner in the evening." in Korean?
Tim: "Mom" is 엄마는.
Debbie: "In the evening" is 저녁 (강조하며 emphasizing) "에".
Tim: "Dinner" is 저녁을.
Debbie: "To eat" is 먹습니다. So what's "Mom eats dinner in the evening." in Korean...?
Tim: 엄마는 저녁에 저녁을 먹습니다. Please repeat after me. 엄마는 저녁에 저녁을 먹습니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Great! 근데 팀? By the way, Tim? I understand what the particles 는 and 을 are, but what's "에"? I don't understand what the point of 에 is.
Tim: That's the main point of today's lesson!
Debbie: Got it! Well, then let's move on to the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Debbie: The focus of this lesson is about the 'Preposition of Time', "에", which means "at, in, on" in English.
Tim: Yes. The preposition of time, 에, indicates the time when attached to a noun. Can you give us examples, Debbie?
Debbie: Sure. We've learned about the seven days of the week in Korean throughout Absolute Beginner Season 2, Lesson 8, so let's quickly review that first. Can you start this off, Tim?
Tim: 일요일
Debbie: "Sunday"
Tim: 월요일
Debbie: "Monday"
Tim: 화요일
Debbie: "Tuesday"
Tim: 수요일
Debbie: "Wednesday"
Tim: 목요일
Debbie: "Thursday"
Tim: 금요일
Debbie: "Friday"
Tim: 토요일
Debbie: "Saturday"
Tim: 월. 화. 수. 목. 금. 토. 일. Please repeat after me. 월 화 수 목 금 토 일.
[pause]
Debbie: Great! Now let's attach 에, which means "on". (강조하며) "On" Tuesday is...
Tim: 화요일 "에"
Debbie: (강조하며) "On" Friday" is...
Tim: 금요일 "에"
Debbie: (강조하며) "On" Sunday is...
Tim: 일요일 "에"
Debbie: Piece of cake! Now let's practice with (강조하며) dates. What's the date today, Tim?
Tim: It's... (강조하며) "October" (강조하며) "18th" today.
Debbie: "October 18th" in Korean is...?
Tim: Wait a sec. Hmm... 일월. 이월. 삼월. 사월. 오월. 육월. 칠월. 팔월. 구월. 시월. 시월! "October" is 시월 and "18th" is... Wait a second... 일. 이. 삼. 사. 오. 육. 칠.... 십육. 십칠. 십팔. 십팔! "18th" is 십팔 일! That means "October 18th" is 시월 십팔일.
Debbie: And how about (강조하며) "on" October 18th?
Tim: 시월 십팔일 (강조하며) "에"
Debbie: How about Christmas day? (강조하며) "On" Dec 25th is...
Tim: October is 시월. November is 십일 월 and "December" is 십이 월. 십이 "월"!
Debbie: "25th" is "20" is 이십 plus "5" is 오, so "25" is 이십 오. 이십 오"일"! Then, (강조하며) "on" December 25th is...
Tim: 십이 월 이십 오일 (강조하며) "에"
Debbie: Great! Now let's try a few examples with time. (강조하며) "At" 1 o'clock is...?
Tim: "one" 한 + "o'clock" 시, 한 시...So "at" 1 o'clock is 한시"에"
Debbie: (강조하며) "At" 2 o'clock is...?
Tim: "Two" 두 + "o'clock" 시 is 두 시, which means "at" 2 o'clock is 두시 "에". Listeners, please repeat after me. 한 시에, 두시에.
[pause]
Debbie: Great! We've just learned about "morning, afternoon, and evening" from the lesson vocabulary. "Morning" is..?
Tim: 아침. So (강조하며) "in" the morning is...?
Debbie: 아침"에". How about "afternoon"?
Tim: 점심. So (강조하며) "in" the afternoon is...?
Debbie: 점심"에". How about "evening"?
Tim: 저녁. So (강조하며) "in" the evening is...?
Debbie: 저녁"에". Listeners, please repeat after Tim.
Tim: 아침"에"
[pause]
Tim: 점심"에"
[pause]
Tim: 저녁"에"
[pause]
Debbie: Excellent! Listeners, please remember that "Time (Noun)" + 에 (e) "at, in" means "at" a certain time. That's all for this lesson. Thanks for listening.
Tim: 여러분 다음시간까지 안녕!

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23 Comments

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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You can find a Practice Sheet for this Absolute Beginner Season 2 Lesson 16. 
Click on https://www.koreanclass101.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=5

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Wednesday at 4:59 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

안녕하세요, 수아 씨!

Thank you for your comment!

Are you in the US?

미국에부터 있어요 ...

>>미국에 있어요.

여기는 오후 7시 30분 있어요 ...

>>여기는 오후 7시 30분이에요.

아직도 저녁이 안 먹었어요 .. 빠이 빠이 ㅋㅋㅋㅋ

>>아직도 저녁을 안 먹었어요.

Thank you for making these good sentences! Please let me know anytime if you have questions!


Best,

Rebecca

Team KoreanClass101.com

수아
Sunday at 8:33 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

안녕하세요 미국에부터 있어요 ...

여기는 오후 7시 30분 있어요 ...

아직도 저녁이 안 먹었어요 .. 빠이 빠이 ㅋㅋㅋㅋ

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Thursday at 11:27 am
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Hi Sarah,


Thank you for posting. You can use both 에/에는 for the same meaning, however, there 'is' a subtle difference in the nuance--If you use the phrase '에는', it is a bit more specific--and usually means that the speaker was discussing other engagements/things that he/she does before he spoke the sentence mentioned. For example:


금요일에는 친구들을 만나요. (I meet friends on Friday)


If this sentence is spoken, the speaker will likely provide information on what he/she does on other days.


However, if the speaker states:

금요일에 데이트 했어요. (I went on a date on Friday)


He will not have to provide the information on what he did on other days.


Hope this was of help. Please let us know if you have any other questions!

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Sarah
Wednesday at 12:42 am
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Hi!

In "오후에는 숙제를 합니다", why is there 는? Does it work without 는 as well?

Thanks, you are a wonderful team!

Sarah

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Friday at 11:16 pm
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Hi Tom,


Thanks for posting. 먹습니다 means 'to eat(declarative present tense)', and is not passive. I meant to say that 아침을 8시에 먹습니다 means that 'breakfast is eaten at 8am' (which indicates that the speaker ate breakfast at 8am).

Sorry for the confusion!


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Tom
Thursday at 4:35 am
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Hi Lyn,


Thanks for replying. So does that mean that the verb 먹습니다 is in the passive? :open_mouth:

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Wednesday at 11:00 pm
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Hi Tom,


Thanks for posting. In the sample sentence you provided, it stresses that breakfast is eaten specifically at eight am, meaning there was probably another sentence that preceded it which discussed breakfast. It does not mean 'Breakfast eats at 9am, but rather, breakfast is eaten (specifically at) 8am.)


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Tom
Wednesday at 5:25 am
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Shouldn't "아침은 8시에 먹습니다" actually mean "The breakfast eats at 8 o'clock"? Since 은/는 is the subject marking particle...

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Friday at 3:04 pm
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Hi John,


Thanks for the comment.

You did great work!:razz:


It would be "저는 점심을 1시에 먹습니다" more natural.


Enjoy Korean Lessons with us!

Thanks:wink:


Anne,

Team KoreanClass101.com

John Thompson
Friday at 5:20 am
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Regarding ("점심은 1시에 먹습니다." ("I eat lunch at 1."), would it be okay to say "저는 점심은 1시에 먹습니다."? (Use two topic-marking particles?) Otherwise what would be correct and natural?


Thanks.


-John